Debunking Myths with Brené Brown

Discovered in, and happily bought from Waterstones in summer 2014, cast aside for fiction some time in August 2014, divinely rediscovered at the side of my bed, December 2014.

Discovered in, and happily bought from Waterstones in summer 2014; cast aside for fiction some time in August 2014; divinely rediscovered at the side of my bed, December 2014.

If I hadn’t spent weeks contacting all manner of psychotherapists and psychologists for “complementary consultations” earlier this year, which would form the basis of an article I’d pitched, quite possibly I’d never have come across this fascinating woman and her research. The name was delivered with a side of ‘no-can-do-on-the-free-thing-but-this-might-help-you-out’ to my email inbox, and researching her opened up a treasure trove of wisdom that at the time, literally spoke to me. 6-8 months later, unfortunately the article remains unwritten as anonymous magazine stopped replying to my emails – my fault – but good news is, I have this book.

Just a snippet from Chapter 2…

MYTH #1: Vulnerability Is Weakness

“The perception that vulnerability is weakness is the most-widely accepted myth about vulnerability and the most dangerous. When we spend our lives pushing away and protecting ourselves from feeling vulnerable or from being perceived as too emotional, we feel contempt when others are less capable or willing to mask feelings, suck it up, and soldier on. We’ve come to the point where, rather than respecting and appreciating the courage and daring behind vulnerability, we let our fear and discomfort become judgement and criticism.”

Brené asks for her reader to consider a culture or social system you’re apart of when she poses deliberate questions in the book. Almost instantly, I think of my immediate family who I’d say are entangled within said paragraph above, and I believed/ still embody through my actions, myth number 1. If you’re unaware of Brené Brown, her light and airy website is the best place to start or better yet, type her name into Google (minus the accent), followed by TED.

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