Category Archives: Interviews

INTERVIEW: Amelia Fergusson – the teetotal London writer bares all to help women see the power in their flaws

By age 13, Amelia Fergusson was a seasoned liar who tricked her Caribbean school friends into thinking this London rude gyal was having lots of sex.

In actual fact, as an insecure young girl, she just sought comfort in humour, and was terrified of intimacy. As a 32-year-old mother, she still is.

Back in London, by her early twenties she was comatose under the influence of copious amounts of alcohol and cocaine, and depressed. She had survived domestic violence and was on a downwards spiral only fate could have determined would not end in death.

At 24, she launched a high class escorting agency, spending all her profits on booze and had conned people out of thousands of pounds. These are just a few in a series of fuck-ups catalogued in Pretty Girls Can’t Write – an autobiography of comedic drama, candid FYI’s and retrospection.

“I just wanted to get everything off my chest. Some of the things I’d forgotten about and you also forget why you act a certain way later on in life. It’s through writing it down I realised I hadn’t yet processed that information,” she explained.

Although the book took a month to pen down, the copy was abandoned in a box with scriptwriter Amelia’s other drafts – “I purged and felt much better. I wasn’t ready to publish it and then began worrying about other people, and what if a guy I’m dating reads it!”

Fast-forward more than a year later, Amelia was ready to have others learn from her catastrophic mistakes, mentored by humour in what I can confidently say is a book every reader will see themselves in.

Amelia Fergusson

Amelia’s podcast on iTunes is likely to be as unadulterated as her writing so it’s not one to miss

The book covers your teenage years to late twenties. What’s so important about this period, particularly in a girl’s life?

I’ll start by saying this – I’m so glad I’m above 30! Now I’ve come out of those ten years, especially with my drinking and everything else involved with it, I just really know who I am. In your teens and twenties, you’re still trying to decide and set boundaries and keep your self-esteem up. It’s also very easy when you’re not so aware of who you are to get swept away by relationships and have guys affect your self-worth, then it’s a downwards spiral. So for me, those ten years were quite a revelation [laughs]. I feel those are the years you should be learning about yourself and then in your thirties, you become a bit more settled and responsible.

Is this the kind of book you would’ve liked to read back then?

Definitely but I don’t think I would’ve learnt from it. However, I would liked to have known other people were going through the same stuff.

Often people go through life blaming others and feeling like a victim because of whatever has happened to them. Do you believe everything in your life happened for a reason?

My tattoo, I don’t know if you can see it? [I couldn’t on the Skype camera] says ‘Maktub’ which means ‘Whatever happens, happens for a reason’ and that is me all over. Also when I started going to Kabbalah, I was taught in every obstacle you need to look for the light. What is this challenge being sent to you to learn from?

It’s a sore subject but the situation you went through with ‘John’ aged 17 – I wondered if you’d ever gotten closure from him, or an explanation? Later in the book, you say you’d spoken to him – what was that interaction like?

It was weird. He got in touch and apologised and I did let it go only because I grew up with him and saw he’d changed. As a young teenager, he was such a talented musician and would be the opening act for artists like Beenie Man when they came to St Vincent. He went from that downhill towards drugs and gangs. Then about five or six years ago, he was murdered. He’d sent me a message over Facebook just before he died saying he’d been trying to get in touch which really affected me…I’m a big believer in karma. Even if you do change your life, something will happen. But I did forgive him.

Taking your experiences with alcoholism, what do you feel people don’t understand about alcohol abuse from the outside looking in?

I have friends who are very aware of drug abuse but when I say I have an alcohol problem, they can’t put the two together. They can understand a cocaine addict but not an alcoholic. Or if they do understand an alcoholic, it’s those they see sitting on a park bench. But these are people who weren’t there when I was locked in my house for days on end and when I did finally emerge, I’d be me again. The days I had to show up for work, I’d show up, but  even though I was there – my mind was foggy, I had constant sweats – I wasn’t my normal self. People also don’t understand a lot of young people have an alcohol addiction. Most people just assume it’s only older men who drink their cans of lager in the park.

So is it really an all or nothing situation for a person with alcohol dependency?

Oh definitely. I know a lady who was sober for 27 or 37 years. She had some issues going on and wasn’t going to AA as much. Then she went back out and within a month had a heart attack, she started drinking so much. Now she’s been back in AA for two years but literally it goes back immediately – there’s no sense of moderating it at all.

What were people’s reactions to the book especially your parents – have they read it?

Oh, God no. Actually my mum keeps asking for the name of the book and I haven’t told her! It’s funny because when I was partying a lot and doing drugs, there were times she’d call me and because of the time difference between here and the Caribbean where they live, it’d be about midnight and I’d already be off my head. I’d say, ‘Mum, I can’t talk right now, I’m doing coke!’ – that’s the relationship I have with my mum. She knows how crazy I can be, but I’ve never really spoken with her seriously about things like what went on with my son’s father. I don’t think she knows how much of an effect it’s had on me.

Would you prefer her not to read it? And what about your dad?

My dad? God, no, he’d probably have a heart attack! My parents are very aware of how I am, but there are certain things I don’t feel they need to know. They know I’m naughty [laughs]. Not all my friends have read it yet but the ones who have, found it funny. People who don’t know me at all have said they really appreciate the honesty and the humour. I just wanted everyone to laugh.

The wisdom in the book starts early on but you were really eager for it not to be taken as a guide on how to live your life – why?

I didn’t want anyone to think I’m this self-help person because I’m far from it. I just wanted to share what I’ve learnt because it’s worked for me, and if you’re going through the same experiences, maybe try doing it this way.

 

Besides Pretty Girls Can’t Write, you have a period drama currently in production [set 15 years after slavery in the Caribbean] – what else are you working on?

I have another script for a period drama and a short film I should be filming next year. I’ve been writing, writing, writing, keeping myself busy and out of trouble. People think I’m so boring now because I’m either at home writing or reading, but they don’t understand I need to do this! I can’t be out and about – it would just all go wrong [laughs].

Find Amelia on Instagram or encouraging other writers with the Pretty Girls Can’t Write podcast coming soon to iTunes.

To buy a copy of the book, click here.

DOCUMENTARY SHORT – Exhibit B: Art That Shook Black Britain

‘A guilty pleasure,’ ‘grotesque parody,’ ‘highly confrontational, but yet exquisitely beautiful,’ Exhibit B: Art That Shook Black Britain, captures the public outcry that followed one man, Brett Bailey, from South Africa to London.

Known for his radical explorations into post-colonial Africa, the white South African artist crafts exhibitions to his audience who span across the world, ‘turning the gaze back on Europeans’ he says, in order to challenge the atrocities of colonialism and slavery.

Exhibit B, the second in what was a three-part series of human installations featuring live black actors, was met with critical acclaim at the 2014 Edinburgh International Festival, but when news broke that it was making its way to London’s Barbican Arts Centre in September last year, the Black community was outraged; sparking protests and national debates on an unimaginable scale. 

On the surface #BoycottTheHumanZoo – the campaign that lit the match on this already volatile art offering, appeared to be an us versus them scenario – ‘them’ being the creators, the elite institutions and financial supporters of Bailey’s work and ’us’ – angry Black people. However what I found while researching is that the Black community were sincerely hurt; not only by the flippancy expressed by these art powerhouses but at their history being presented, yet again, by an outsider. To describe it simply as black and white would undermine the wider issues that arise, which could potentially compromise the entire arts industry. If artistic freedom is to remain intact, is there ever a place for censorship? Should there be boundary lines for fear of treading on another culture’s toes? 

I spent one afternoon in London on the opening day of Exhibit B in search of conversations to help gauge public opinion. What became clear midway is that the answers remained elusive, but this event would become pivotal to future discussions in and around race, history and UK arts. 

See below for further reading…

Vicky Gayle: Facebook/ TwitterRafel Thompson: Twitter

*Brett Bailey on his controversial art serial.

*VIDEO: Sara Myers calls for people to sign the petition.

*Nitro – the Arts organisation who casted the actors and models.

*Akala speaks out on the Huffington Post.

*The Barbican criticises the ‘extreme nature’ of protesters.

*The performers respond.

MUSIC INTERVIEW: Lucan Mills – The rapper from Winchester who vows to always keep it real and acoustic

Rap that sears its way forcibly through a blues band while at the same time overwhelms you to close your eyes and sway, is a winning combination when executed properly.

Winchester rapper and songwriter Lucan Mills, whose debut EP Level 1 awaits its official iTunes release – 10 years on from gracing stages as a support act for Tinie Tempah and G Unit – marks the beginning of a new chapter for the 26-year-old.

To keep the music in its rawest form, Lucan has composed his own sound – an uptempo fusion of hip hop, jazz and funk – weaved together with realism and lyrics that puncture each note played by his seven-piece band. More than two years in the making ‘without them the live shows wouldn’t be what they are,’ Lucan admitted, and they go by the names: Graham Henderson (Bass); Alex Villar (Guitar); Louis Yalaz (Drums); Jen Watson (Saxophone); Kit Marsden/ Herty Hill/ Jacob Stoney (Keys); and James Tashario (Vocals).

In the lead up to national tour dates, the first being tomorrow at MK Dons Stadium, myself and Lucan had a lot to talk about – like how he learnt to rap so quick, the ‘weird’ music industry, and why he’ll be forever grateful to the likes of David Bowie and Jay Z.

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Now you’re from Winchester but my geography is poor, so I can see that it’s kind of close to London. Was music a bit part of the scene growing up there?

Well Craig David was Southampton based and it was very much the garage and hip hop scene down there growing up. He would emcee in a club called Rhino, which I did too a few years after, so there was definitely a buzz around it and everybody listened to the music – but don’t get me wrong, I was probably the only one rapping in my school at the time so that was different.

You must have definitely stood out then.

That’s a good way to put it! Especially back then it wasn’t as widely accepted as it is now so I definitely got ‘but you’re white’ all the time and people would take the mick, but I’m still doing it now so that faded off over the years.

What was your response to that ignorance?

Back then I used to just laugh it off. I loved doing it so much and knew that I could do it, that I just ignored it and got on with it. But when I got to college and was making more tracks, people understood that this is what I wanted to do and accepted it.

Listening to your voice now, you don’t sound like how you rap – you rap quite hard which reminds me of grime. Did you take influences from grime when you were crafting your sound initially?

100 percent. I’m a massive Kano fan and when I was growing up, he was just lyrically brilliant and in the US – Jay Z and Eminem were the biggest influences for me. I would study their tracks, not just their lyrics but it was more about flow, and I was also listening to a lot of UK grime. I can switch between all of them, it just depends what beat I’m listening to, but at the same time I’m very careful because people will say I’m not a grime artist. There’s a fine line between what’s going to be credible and believable.

I understand that. You mentioned Kano and Jay Z – were they the rappers that you would imitate when you were developing your rap skills and speed?

Definitely, some of the early tracks I learnt like So Ghetto, a really old track off one of Jay Z’s first albums and Imaginary Player, all those songs about flow and lyrics, and the way he would change tempo was similar to Eminem and Kano in P’s and Q’s. It was all about tempo for me at the same time as being lyrically impressive and thinking quick on my feet. David Bowie was also a big influence for me, I went to a show of his just before he’d finished touring. I’d listened to Bowie all my life because my dad was a huge fan and I took a lot in from watching how he’d perform and his stage presence.

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You probably get told often that your music is distinctive but there’s obviously been some conscious decisions you’ve made to achieve that sound.

It was difficult because when I first started making music I would rap over mixtape beats and other people’s stuff but with my own music, I was always very conscious that I wanted to have a live band. So once I’d made that decision it was a case of bringing together really good musicians who wanted to be part of it. I spent a long time crafting the sound – adding saxophone, having keys and synths – and trying to incorporate everything together to give it a live jazz feel that’s funky and different, at the same time as keeping the hip hop element strong. I’m still working on it – it’s constantly evolving but it took a while to get the sound that we have now.

IMG_1160 smallHow is it that you and the band work together because there’s a lot of creative heads to factor in?

It’s mad, when I first got them together I had my songs, we’d go into a room and go through them all but it’s different with a production track. You’ve got the band that play it but then I very much wanted their input into the music as well, so the tracks completely changed from the production version that we had into the live version. What you hear on the EP now is not what they originally were and with all these creative people as you say, they all had a different flavour that they wanted to bring to the table. Those songs evolved over a year or so before I actually went in and re-recorded the EP from scratch live. It’s a real collaboration of ideas but I want to take it even further because there’s so much that we can do to merge the live and electronic sound together and make something huge.

One of the songs I really like on the EP is Stay Lucky. Although it’s not the lead single, it’s very pretty and heartfelt – where was your head at when you wrote and recorded it?

That song I wrote originally as a poem, it was never a song. I can’t even remember what inspired the rhythm or what beat I was listening to, it was just a block of writing, but I loved the words so much that when I first started performing live with just me and a guy on piano, I got him to play this nice riff and I would rap the lyrics, almost like spoken word. I carried on doing that for a year maybe more and it just evolved. It wasn’t until a few months before I did the EP that I decided I wanted it to be a proper song and literally within a few seconds I came up with the Stay Lucky chorus, which stemmed from a story with my granddad and this ring he gave me with a horseshoe on it. The chorus isn’t complicated but it really fitted the tone of my singer’s voice. It’s one of James’ favourite songs to sing, who is my vocalist when we perform live, but on the EP it’s Wadé singing.

You’ve been gigging over summer and on the 31st October you’re playing at the MK Stadium so @menmademusic asked on Twitter if you’re an MK Dons FC supporter?

I’ve actually got a season ticket for MK Dons because my dad used to live in Milton Keynes and when they got promoted to the championships it was a really good deal. I haven’t had a chance to go to many games recently because I’ve been away, which is annoying, but I’ll be at the home game with the band. It’s a good atmosphere when I’ve been so to be asked to perform there is really cool and random because I don’t know how they knew I was even a musician – but it should be a good day.

Tell me about Ed Sheeran – you performed on stage with him and I know it was a lucky coincidence.

I was at a night in Clapham a couple of years ago and Jamal Edwards from SBTV came in and had bought Ed along. A mate of mine was running the night at the time and I happened to be sat chatting to him [Ed] about it. He went on stage to perform You Need Me and then he said, ‘I want to call some rappers up I was chatting to earlier’ and I had to take the opportunity when it was there, so I jumped up on stage and made it up as I went along. I’ve got the video forever so hopefully if I meet him again, I’ll show it to him.

Most artists have a bigger vision and motivation for why they’re an artist, what would you say that yours is?

I just know it’s what I’ve always wanted to do from the minute I can remember – the pictures of me putting headphones on, strumming away on a tennis racket watching Bowie on the TV when I was about four. My vision has always been to be respected for doing what I love and if another rapper turns around and says, ‘You know what? You’re a brilliant rapper’ – that’s my dream. When you see artists like Ed Sheeran sell out Wembley and the crowd are chanting the songs – just pure respect for your talent – that would be special. It’s not about the money. I know people say that all the time, it’s a boring cliche, but money can only go so far. If I could have a massive crowd of people all singing my songs and actually the songs do something for them, that would be everything to me.

And what stadium would you love to sell out?

Oh, Hollywood Bowl, Wembley, Coachella, Glastonbury – but for now Brixton Academy would be awesome.

For tickets to see Lucan Mills headline at Bloomsbury Lanes, London for their Hot Vox music launch night click here.

Website/ Twitter/ /Instagram

Abigail Jackson: Healing women’s hearts one literary anthology at a time

In searching for a way to combine her joint passion for literature and women’s rights, 24-year-old teaching assistant and aspiring novelist, Abigail Jackson, from Lewisham South-East London, founded the Red Ink Project a not-for-profit anthology which documents the female experience.

Abigail Jackson Founder of the Red Ink ProjectLaunched in 2012 during Abi’s second year at Greenwich University where she’s now a PHD candidate examining emotion and identity in post-colonial Caribbean literature she ’wanted to give women a chance to express themselves under the banner of human rights’.

On a bus journey home, Abi decided to start the project once and for all.

A themed anthology published every two years, with the first year’s proceeds going to charity, the project champions storytelling as a way to ‘break the cycle of silence’, while its name represents that although ‘we all have the same blood, we’re treated differently’.

She said: “Sometimes it’s easy for us to believe that our story is the only one and by putting yours out there, you’ll never know how you’re affecting somebody else who’s reading it.

“One thing that’s important about sharing stories is so that people know they’re not alone and although not everybody enjoys reading non-fiction, I think biographies are so popular because we want to know about people’s lives and to see if there’s anything similar in our own.”

Moved to tears by some of the first submissions under the theme, Rites of Passage; Rights of Womanhood, which included stories of sexual abuse, ‘coming out’ and loss Abi was particularly moved by one woman’s grief, which forced her to relive a painful moment in her own life.

She said: “This lady wrote a letter to her dad who had passed away around the same time as my grandma, so it brought up a lot of the emotions that I felt and things that I could’ve said that I wasn’t able to.”

Abigail’s grandmother died suddenly on the same morning she and her family had planned to visit.

“To arrive and be told that she’d passed an hour ago was very upsetting,” she said.

She added: “There was also another lady who’d gone through a very difficult childhood experience where she’d been sexually abused and at the end of her story she wrote a poem to express another aspect of how she felt. It was an unusual way of doing it but her story ended positively, she’s now happily married.

“I loved that all Rites of Passage; Rights of Womanhood anthology the stories didn’t stop at the suffering or struggle, at the end they overcame their issues and that’s very important too.”

Surprised by the success of the first anthology that began as a WordPress blog, Abi initially struggled finding women to submit.

Men showed more of an interest in the page, something she found ‘really strange but encouraging’, and it wasn’t until she posted an advert online through the Guardian that ‘things started getting serious’, which prompted a relaunch and brand new website.

Fast-forward post its release, Abi was daunted at having to reinvigorate people’s interest in the project for its second edition and explained how a chance meeting with Laura Bates, founder of The Everyday Sexism Project, helped renew her confidence.

She said: “At the secondary school I used to work at as a library assistant, the head of the library was such an activist. His issue was sexism in school and so he managed to get Laura in for the day. I knew I wasn’t going to get this opportunity again so I spoke to her and we had this long chat about feminism and womanism.

“Since then we’ve kept in contact and she’s said that whenever something is happening that she’ll retweet and share it for me, so she also gave me the confidence to think it was a project that could go further and get people’s attention.”

Now technically in its fourth year, submissions for the 2016 anthology, Out of Body Experience, an exploration of the female body in today’s society, have now opened.

Provoked by the need to address ‘something not quite right’ in conversations happening across communities and the media, current events such as the politicising of Nadiya Hussain’s British Bake Off win and comedian Nicole Arbour’s controversial, Dear Fat People video, all inspired this emotive theme.

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She said ‘it went viral for all the wrong reasons’.

“There was just no compassion at all which is why people feel how they do about themselves.

“Although it’s personal, the female body is something that’s quite political.

Source: The Guardian online. Photograph by Linda Nylind.

Source: The Guardian online. Photograph by Linda Nylind.

“I loved Great British Bake Off so when Nadiya won I was happy because she was the best one there, but it was interesting how quickly features about her appeared in the media because ‘she’s actually British’ and wears a hijab.”

The proceeds of anthology sales will this time support Daughters of Eve, a charity founded by prolific female genital mutilation campaigner, Leyla Hussein.

Her 2014 Channel 4 documentary, The Cruel Cut, helped put FGM back on the national agenda and ‘debunked the myths’ that it was a strictly African practice not happening here in the UK.

‘Speechless’ after watching the hour long programme, Abi had already been following the charity on Twitter and was ‘impassioned’ by their work, but felt they deserved far more exposure.

With the anthology priced low at £1 for an e-copy and £4 for a printed version, Abi hopes to raise close to £100 for Daughters of Eve this year, but is unsure of what to expect when proceeds from the first book totalled half of this.

Down the line she would love to be able to transition from self-publishing to using an independent publisher, but more importantly, Abi wants the anthology to have a wider audience and regards it as a springboard for budding writers.

She said: “The main reason why I started the Red Ink Project is for people to have a platform but also for these women to share stories.

“They’ve been so brave and it’d be great if they had a huge audience so people can be touched in the same way I was.”

In between studying for her PHD and working with young people, Abi has recently submitted her own short stories for publication to an anthology and is putting the finishing touches on a novel.

She added: “I’m hoping to send it off to agents within the year, if I just pull my socks up and start editing it properly.”

Submissions for RED INK Vol. 2: Out of Body Experience close on January 1 2016.

For more information visit: www.redinkproject.org

Follow Abigail on Twitter here.

Crowdfunding talk on BBC West Midlands’ Chatback show

No selfies with the presenters, I settled with hugs during the break but  the guest room was perfect for a snap.

No selfies with the presenters, I settled with hugs during the break but the guest room was perfect for a snap.

A friend of mine asked on Saturday night if I was weird and practised my interview responses in the mirror like her, to which I replied: “Out loud, yes! You have to!” and I did, hoping that Chatback’s Joe Aldred or Nikki Tapper didn’t open the interview with: “So tell me about the campaign” because that leaves far too much window to trip over my words. Thankfully the veteran presenters have much better style than that and gave me a wonderful introduction which calmed my nerves somewhat.

If you’re unaware, just recently I launched a campaign to raise £1700 remaining course fees for journalism school in Manchester. Utilising my editorial skills I’m approaching contacts old and new for commissions, with all profits going straight to my campaign. Meanwhile I’m crowdfunding so that hopefully with the two combined, I can just focus on my studies.

It was great being able to share what I’m trying to achieve as I don’t tend to often, and while there met another guest on the show, Lenise Harris, founder of the Women’s Reform Organisation. A ‘non profit organisation delivering holistic support to vulnerable women at risk of crime or reoffending upon release from prison’, the charity is in its infancy and born from Lenise’s own experiences of vulnerability as a young female which sparked a desire to help others as she became older. To help grow the West Midlands organisation, Lenise is actively looking for volunteers to support with areas such as mentoring, outreach and marketing so for more on her tune in at 01.07 – 01.11 or go to: www.womensreform.org.

Thank you to everybody who listened live and for any who weren’t able to, you have 28 days starting from now to catch it on BBC iPlayer. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02nhr5f#auto (Skip straight to 45.15 – 55.27 for my segment)

Crowdfunding campaign lands me on BBC WM with the Chatback team in Birmingham

It’s been an incredibly busy few months what with relocating to another city, becoming a journalism student again and being thrust into a 37.5 hour course schedule but given my most recent circumstances, I absolutely have to get back into the habit of oversharing and blogging.

Just recently I launched a campaign on crowdfunding website, Go Fund Me on the back of some advice from a friend and my annoyance at always waiting for money rather than getting it myself, to help raise my £1700 outstanding course fees.

Vicky G Course Fees Campaign

From observation the most successful people I know are those who once they’ve amassed enough experience, draw a line at unpaid work, but I’ve never been entirely confident at monetising my skills.

Nonetheless, the reality is that I’m only ever a month away from being evicted if I fail to raise my rent, like a few weeks ago when the desperate Whats App messages for ‘rent contributions’ went out, but it still didn’t amount to enough. Add to that monthly outgoings of more than £700 on a zero hour contract job and an instalment agreement with my course provider, it was time to drop the pride and get clever. Leverage my creativity and find a way to make this financial challenge mutually beneficial, like a transaction.

The idea was born, as a headline, of course: ‘Manchester journalism student sells her skills in a bid to raise £1700 outstanding course fees’, and with a sneaky day off from my school, a Go Fund Me page was created alongside a compelling narrative of my journey to the present day, ready to send to every acquaintance I’ve ever made.

I can’t explain the weight that was lifted once the campaign became active – I haven’t done any crying since which is a good sign (actually that’s a lie I had a meltdown over the bank holiday weekend and closed my blinds midway through the afternoon) but though progress is slow, it’s now a visible scale on my funding page.

Switching sides to be interviewed, I’ll be chatting to BBC WM’s Nikki Tapper and Joe Aldred tonight on Chatback at 8.30pm about the campaign and detailing more of my backstory that I haven’t mentioned above.

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Please support it! All the relevant links are embedded in this post for you to click on and if you do happen to listen live or on BBC iPlayer afterwards, I’d love to hear from you.

P.S. 1. If I have a good voice for radio let me know as I secretly want to add broadcaster to my repertoire and 2. If you have any advice for how I can push my campaign over twitter where most of my followers are strangers, tips are most welcome.

Pure Halal Beauty Review Hits 1k

Before viewing the image below, it’s essential that you focus on the positive – my first beauty vlog reviewing Rose Brown’s line of Halal certified cosmetics under brand, Pure Halal Beauty – was viewed more than a handful of times!

Ignore that said video has received only one thumbs up (you’re all haters) meanwhile my never updated YouTube channel has only three subscribers and this has taken three years to happen! (There’s blurred lines between self-depreciation and sarcasm right now, but all in good blogging fun).

Another positive, this was the first ever vlog to feature on women’s fashion and lifestyle website, Bonafide Supernova when I was part of the team in 2011/12. Following their journey and celebrating their successes – including picking up a Creative award at the 2014 Clothes Show – it’s amazing how much Samantha and Tamara have grown this brand so kudos to you ladies, and kudos to me.

Click here to read: Pure Halal Beauty – Birmingham’s Best Kept Secret, my interview with founder Rose Brown, originally featured on Bonafide Supernova.

Pure Halal Beauty Review TwentysomethingMe